Denham and Monkey Mia

This whole region of the WA Coast (in fact the entire WA coast) is stunning with it’s turquoise water and sandy beaches, really just continuing the theme that was started from the moment we hit the coast line of this State. Our primary intention here was to visit the dolphins of Monkey Mia but being homeless nomads we opted out of paying exorbitant fees at the conservation area itself and instead checked into the Shark Bay Caravan park in Denham, only a 10 minute drive past the Francois Peron National Park to Monkey Mia.

I’ve only been vaguely aware of Monkey Mia – there were stories of how you can swim with dolphins there and feed them but it wasn’t something I paid a lot of attention to. Once we were headed there however I thought it would be an exciting thing for our children to be so close to dolphins in the wild and have a greater appreciation for these beautiful creatures. That’s not quite how it went though!

The story of this area is a little sad, when it was discovered people would swim with and feed the dolphins at will and apparently they became so dependent on humans they would even leave their calves out in the deeper water to die while they came in to be fed (I’m not sure what that says about Dolphin maternal instincts, a free feed never enticed me to leave my babies?!) Now it’s a strictly controlled conservation area and the dolphins come in several times in the morning to be fed but within this area there is no interaction with them (unless you are one of the lucky ones to be called forward and give them a fish) and they are restricted to several fish each.

When you arrive there is a board stating when the dolphins had come in previously and how many people were on the beach watching them, luckily for us they had only been in the once and that was much earlier so we were expecting a sighting soon. We setup for play time on the beach and awaited the royal guests arrival. It was exciting sighting the first shadows slipping through the water near the jetties, and the park ranger (or whatever they were called!) started issuing orders about where to stand and what to do. We were able to stand in the water initially as three dolphins started slipping past the gathered crowd entertaining us all – once they moved onto feeding though everyone had to return to the beach and they selected three people to come into the water and hold the fish. We missed out on that count which might have held the kids interest a bit longer – as it was I was shocked to hear them asking if they could go get lunch while the dolphins frolicked right in front of them! I know my children like their food but really? Apparently natural wonders still only hold their attentions for a short period of time but as we were enjoying it they were ordered to entertain themselves on the beach.

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Arrival of the Visitors

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The Crowd

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Ready for the Close Up

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Showing Off

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Feeding Up

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Chilling at the Resort Area

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Turtle Sighting from the Jetty

 

We also went out on one of the two catamarans that operate out of Monkey Mia, once for a sunset cruise which was all about relaxing with a glass of wine and watching the sun go down and then the next day for a wildlife cruise of spotting dolphins, turtles and sharks – all of which were sighted. The girls had a great time as the catamaran was loaded with kids of a similar age and they all took over the netted areas between the hulls and screamed “dolphin” in unison when there was a sighting – I’m very surprised they dolphins came in for a bow wave ride with all that noise going on! We however had a very relaxing time with the short ones off with the gang, had almost forgotten how wonderful it is to be out on the water after so many months of looking at it from a beach (yes, I know, terribly hard life we lead)…

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Monkey Mia Jetty

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Our Ride

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Out at Sea

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Ahoy Captain

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Hello Sailor

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Sunny Days

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Sunset Cruise

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A Little Sisterly Love

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